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Happy Lunar New Year!

February 3, 2011

Heritage Student Foundation wishes you a happy lunar new year!

Many people around the world will be celebrating this holiday today, called Seolnal (Korea), Spring Festival (China), Tết (Vietnam), and many other names.

We hope that being so far away from their home countries does not mean that students will miss out on the holiday festivities, as we know that many communities will be celebrating with dinners, parades, and more!

Students, take this opportunity to share what this holiday means to you!

Feeling adventurous? Try out a Chinese hot pot meal recipe that was featured in the Chicago Tribune:

4 ribs celery, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

2 large carrots, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

2 large onions, cut into 1/2-inch dice

1 teaspoon black peppercorns

2 bay leaves

2 sprigs fresh thyme

1/4 bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley

2 star anise

1 piece (2 inches long) ginger, minced

1/2 cup soy sauce or tamari sauce

2 quarts chicken stock or low-sodium broth, plus extra if needed

1 whole chicken, 5-6 pounds

1. Combine the celery, carrots, onions, peppercorns, bay leaves, thyme, parsley, star anise, ginger and soy sauce in a stockpot or large Dutch oven. Add stock.

2. Add the chicken to the pot breast side up. It should be completely covered with stock; if not, add more.

3. Cover; heat to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low, cook 45 minutes. Adjust seasoning. Turn off the heat. Let pot stand, covered, 30 minutes to 1 hour. Remove the chicken. Strain the broth, reserving the vegetables. Carve the chicken; serve with the vegetables and bowls of broth.

Nutrition information

Per serving: 763 calories, 45% of calories from fat, 38 g fat, 11 g saturated fat, 219 mg cholesterol, 21 g carbohydrates, 83 g protein, 3,052 mg sodium, 3 g fiber

(Source: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-02-02/features/sc-food-0128-chinese-20110130_1_arthur-boehm-chinese-year-noodles)

And don’t forget to offer your lunar new year’s wishes to your family and friends with the phrases below!

Chinese New Years Wishes: The literal translation is “Wishing you a wonderful new year”

Korean New Years Wishes: The literal translation is “I wish you great fortune this new year.”

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